Important information about Commercial Breeders

Please find below important information for any prospective IG owner regarding Commercial Dog Breeders breeding Italian Greyhounds and IG Crossed Breeds in the UK. If you are looking to buy an IG puppy, please read on…

The Italian Greyhound Rescue Charity receives many enquiries from potential Italian Greyhound puppy buyers, most of whom do not wish to buy from commercial breeders. As detailed below, commercial breeders (people who breed and sell puppies for financial gain) should have a breeding license issued by their local council. However, we know of only one online puppy sales site that requires the advertisers’ commercial licence number to be given. Therefore, prospective owners need to be alert and not simply rely on a licence number to identify commercial breeders.

IGR,IG Full Body 100dpi

[Copyright: Italian Greyhound Rescue Charity]

The Charity hopes the following information collated from the relevant council websites will be useful in identifying if the breeder you have contacted is a commercial breeder of Italian Greyhounds or Italian Greyhound Crossbreeds and has, or requires, a breeder’s licence.

UK Law states in the Breeding and Sale of Dogs (Welfare) Act 1999 that a local council-issued dog breeding license is required for anyone who keeps a breeding establishment (including private dwellings) which meets any of the following conditions:

  • Anyone “in the business” of breeding and selling dogs (trading) needs to be licensed regardless of the number of litters they have in a 12 month period. For example if the person is breeding and selling dogs for commercial gain and/or regularly adverting puppies/dogs for sale.
  • England and Scotland – if in a 12 month period their dogs give birth to 5 litters or more, regardless of whether they are in the business of breeding and selling dogs.
  • Wales – if in a 12 month period their dogs give birth to 3 litters or more, regardless of whether they are in the business of breeding and selling dogs.

How local authorities decide if an individual is trading or is “in the business” of breeding and selling dogs, differs from council to council. For example, some councils will require anyone who breeds over 2 litters in a 12 month period to be licensed while others may require anyone keeping more than 2 breeding bitches to be licensed. Each council’s requirements should be visible on their council website and further information can be found here.

Licensed commercial breeders are not allowed to mate a bitch if she is less than one year old and breeding is restricted to a maximum limit of 6 litters per bitch, with at least 12 months between each litter of puppies. (Please note, the IGRC recommends that a bitch is bred from no more than three times and has a minimum of two years between each litter.)

In England and Wales, there are six Licensed Commercial Breeders of IGs and IG crosses who are registered with their local council (correct as of July 2017). But, as detailed below, not all Commercial Breeders are registered with their local council.

Prospective owners must be aware that not all breeders who advertise and breed frequently are licensed with their local council. If you come across a commercial breeder whose licence details cannot be found with the local council, please contact the IGRC and they can investigate the breeder further.

Unfortunately, the online world is increasingly becoming the home of unscrupulous breeders. The IGRC recommends that prospective IG owners avoid puppies and dogs that are advertised on the internet. Instead, the Charity advises new owners to attend Kennel Club dog shows where they can meet lots of Italian Greyhounds, talk about the breed with their owners, and register their interest in a puppy with a reputable breeder.

In conclusion, be alert when carrying out your research for an IG or IG-cross puppy. If anything about a breeder or their premises unsettles you, please do not ignore your instincts. And if you have any concerns regarding a particular advert or breeding establishment, please feel free to contact the IGRC to discuss your observations.